Feeling Guilt Regarding Your Narcissistic Parent?

Recently I was thinking of something.  Maybe some of you remember last December, just before Christmas, my mother had her attorney/flying monkey send me a letter asking if I wanted my father’s car.  (here is the post if you missed it:   Coping When Narcissists Hit A New Low)

I thought about the letter the other day, & the wording of it all.  At that time, I felt a lot of guilt even though I knew with every fiber of my being I needed to maintain strict no contact with her.  It was such a difficult time!  I also thought about the fact my mother wanted my help with what she was dealing with after my father’s death.  She expected me to help her, after everything she’s done to me, & there has been a LOT!  Just throwing out a couple of examples…

 

  • My mother threw me into a wall when I was 19 hard enough to give me back pain for 10 years.  Why?  Because she started a fight with me & got mad when I eventually snapped & cussed at her.  She never apologized or even admitted to any of her part in that incident.  She also told people I faked the back pain so I could quit working because I was lazy.
  • My mother stole the savings bonds her mother left me when she died in 2001.  I had to go after her with proof of what the inheritance was worth & copies of the cashed bonds to get it back.  When she sent me a check, I saw she wrote in the memo line, “What you claim Grandma owes you.”
  • Most recently, in 2016.. my mother in-law died.  I hadn’t spoken to her since 2002 because she was so cruel to me.  My parents knew this.  When my parents learned of her passing, they called me & were mad I didn’t tell them in time to attend the funeral & “pay their respects.”  I was stunned that was an option.  I expected them to tell me what a great woman she was, even though they only spoke to her twice in their lives.  I ended up so hurt & angry that I cried & cussed at my parents, which is not my normal behavior.  The more upset I got, the more bored my mother acted.  She then tried getting me to feel sorry for her because she has vertigo.  It didn’t work.  We haven’t spoken since.

 

These are only a few examples.  I have a LOT more.

So anyway, I was thinking of these things & others, & it hit me.  My mother has a LOT of nerve thinking she is entitled to my help after not only doing all of these things, but also not once accepting any responsibility or apologizing for any of the abuse she’s inflicted on me.  She is still the same abusive monster she was when I was a kid.  Her tactics may be different now, but she is still out to hurt & control me  as much as possible if given the chance.  This quickly got rid of any guilt I felt regarding her.

My point (finally, I know.. sorry!) is this….

If you are struggling with feeling guilty regarding your narcissistic parent, for being no contact or feel like now that your parent is elderly & frail, you should take care of her even if you haven’t spoken in years, I really suggest doing what I did.

Consider your relationship with your narcissistic parent.  Think about the things your parent did to you.  Has your parent shown any signs of improving their behavior?  Has she admitted any wrongdoing at all?  If your parent is like most narcissists, you honestly can say no to those questions.  And, if you can say no to those questions, then you need to maintain distance to protect yourself & your mental health.

If you’re still feeling any guilt at this point, also remember- people reap what they sow.  Galatians 6:7 says:

“Be not deceived; God is not mocked: for whatsoever a man soweth, that shall he also reap. ” (KJV)

A person who sows bad seeds will reap a bad harvest, period.  This means that an abusive parent will not be treated with love & kindness indefinitely as a good parent would be treated.  A person can only take so much before they pull away from their abuser, even if that abuser is their parent.  It’s the natural way of things.  You aren’t being petty, childish or any other awful thing people may say you are by putting distance between you & your narcissistic parent.  You’re simply a part of the normal system of reaping & sowing.

 

Lastly, you are NOT dishonoring your abusive parent with either low or no contact.  By maintaining low or no contact, you are removing the opportunity for your parent to sin.  Your parent can’t abuse you if you aren’t there.  You’re also encouraging her to improve her behavior by giving her consequences for her actions.  That is very honorable & loving!  Anyone who tells you that you’re not honoring your narcissistic parent or thinks it’s honorable to tolerate anything your parent dishes out truly does NOT know God or understand His word at all.

 

So remember, Dear Reader… you have no valid reasons to feel guilty regarding your narcissistic parent, but if you do feel guilty, remind yourself of what your parent has done to you like I did.

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4 Comments

Filed under Abuse and the Healing Journey, Christian Topics and Prayers, Complex Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Mental Health, Narcissism

4 responses to “Feeling Guilt Regarding Your Narcissistic Parent?

  1. This is great advice and another reminder of how useful and important it is to keep a written record of the abuse. When we’re tempted to feel guilty because we’ve gone NC, or tempted to break NC, reviewing the record of our abusers conduct reminds us of why we put up that boundary and why we should maintain it. My journal has saved me many times from making the mistake of giving in to the guilt and doing what would harm me and the people I love. And yes, that includes my abuser and her enablers/flying monkeys. As you say, refusing to enable them to abuse you is honorable and loving.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you!

      Oh absolutely. I swear by journal keeping for so many reasons, & having a written record of the abuse is one of those reasons. Mine has helped me as yours has to maintain no contact.

      I find it almost funny how some folks think enabling these people to abuse us is honorable & loving & refusing to allow it is dishonorable & unloving. It really makes no sense. I have 2 emails I haven’t read beyond the couple of lines at the beginning that show up when I open my inbox from someone who attacked me the day before my father’s funeral (nice timing, huh?). Apparently she thinks I’m a “bad Christian” for maintaining no contact with my parents when my father was dying. It literally made me laugh. She displays no Christian behavior, but sure was quick to judge me. The hypocrisy was amazing!

      Liked by 1 person

      • Recently my MNS claimed that I was somehow responsible for the mess she’s made of her own family because I refuse to have anything to do with our CNM and her enablers (of which this sister is one). I suspect that she misses the sympathy she would get from me when she’d call me with the latest report of her misery. And, of course, I was (and probably still am) her favorite scapegoat so not having fresh information about my life must be frustrating for her. But allowing her to dump her negative emotions on me never solved anything. Nothing I said would change the way she treated other people, and that is at the core of her problems. Yes, the hypocrisy is often quite amazing.

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        • Oh yes, obviously this is all your fault! LOL Amazing how they spin anything around to where victims can be to blame for anything. My mother has blamed me for the hole in the ozone. It’s my fault because I drive the car I have. Makes perfect sense, huh? lol

          Liked by 1 person

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